• Slow and Active Streets Launch

    Our Valentine’s Day adventure was a bike ride on Sacramento’s new slow active streets. What a great day with a few bumps in…

  • Volunteer Opportunities for 2021

    Looking for something to do? You’re in the right place. We’ve got plenty of work to…

  • Good news: Cosumnes Community Service District Adopts Strong Climate Policy

    On February 3 the Cosumnes Community Service District (CCSD) adopted an ambitious climate policy, with substantial input from 350 Sacramento (Policy summary…

  • Are You A Fossil-Fuel Addict? Would You Like to Get Clean?

    I breathe air containing exhaust & fumesWe breathe clean air I drink water containing chlorine, fluoride, traces of antibiotics, birth control pills, etc. We drink spring water at the spring; our garden drinks water from the pond and cistern I eat food from mono-crop, fossil-fuel agri- culture, grown in soil that’s full of artificial fertilizers, pesticides and herbicidesWe grow our own food using permaculture by creating a complete mini-ecology and living off the real interest I live in a big tightly insulated house with a big computer-controlled furnace/air- conditioner, a big hot water heater, a big refrigerator, 3 ovens, a dishwasher, and a big green lawnWe live in a small passive solar house, with solar hot water, and a stove+furnace, a cold pantry and a solar food dryer We have herbs, vegetables, chicken, fish, goats, and an orchard within the windbreak I have a master bath with a low-flush toilet, 2 sinks, a shower and a Jacuzzi We have two alternating composting privies, an outdoor shower and a kitchen sink I have an expensive computer-controlled, energy-efficient washer and dryer We wash our clothes in a pedal powered washer (sending graywater to the garden) and dry them on a clothesline I have a widescreen plasma TV, a CD unit, a few other computers and video games We have a laptop powered by PV panels and lots of books and board games I drive a hybrid SUV and an EV Sometimes I take the bus or the train We ride regular bicycles, a 3-wheeler for cargo, or walk, ride our pony cart, or just stay home I buy my clothes and housewares at the mall We spin, weave, sew and shop at the thrift store I work out at the gym to stay in shape We get plenty of exercise I have to watch my diet to prevent diabetesWe feel nourished by the food we grow I feel stressed because I have to work lots of overtime so I can pay all my bills and send my kids to a good collegeWe get plenty of sleep after a day of work and play with our family and neighbors I’m worried about the crime rate while I’m at the office in my cubicle Our village is never empty I have to drive a long way for a vacation We don’t need a vacation—we live in Eden I’m depressed and afraid of the future We feel contented and economically secure But how to make the change? What about relapses? Well, start by absorbing the deeper layer that's underneath the lists above. If Einstein was right in saying that a problem can't be solved by the same mentality that created it, then changing our view of the world is a good place to start. Second, don't give up. Carbon relapses imply that some carbon dioxide that could have been formed and emitted was avoided. Respect the power of No; its discipline sharpens wisdom. Written by Muriel S. via Paradigm Shift For Life

  • Tell Biden: Build Back Fossil Free

    To be a true climate leader and usher in a green, just, and peaceful future, President Biden must…

  • Calling all Middle and High School Students…

    The Student Environmental Activist Training Program (SEAT) started this past week. This exciting 10-week program, designed to empower young people,…

  • And now for some GOOD NEWS!!!

    The City of Sacramento is moving forward with their climate actions, including: First Year Actions. The proposed work plan for 2021 includes many of the Climate…

  • Calling all Middle and High School Students…

    The Student Environmental Activist Training Program (SEAT) will start next Monday, January 25!! It’s a 10-week…

  • Sacramento County CAP: Comments on in-house draft

    As a member of the County’s CAP Stakeholder’s Group, 350 Sacramento recently commented on an administrative (in-house) draft of the CAP. Our comments are…

  • Sac County CAP – Heads Up!

    Climate Action Plan (CAP) advocacy begins in earnest this month. Sacramento County seems to be pushing for rapid completion of the CAP - maybe because it is funded by developers, and pending its adoption, development approvals are subject to lawsuit. Instead of the interactive public outreach that we see for other planning projects, public review is mostly limited to mandated public hearings Check this schedule: Admin Draft We expect to see an “Admin Draft” this week. Our comment by the 19th will likely frame much of our following advocacy. Public Draft About Feb 2, the official draft will be open for public review. It’s important we let the County know at this early opportunity that there’s solid public support for a strong CAP. Public Hearing And on Feb 22 will be the first formal hearing, before the County’s Environmental Commission. Again we need to let the County know that the public expects strong climate action, not business as usual. We’ll post the Admin Draft and links to subsequent documents, and we’ll suggest needed advocacy actions. Our Initial Comments 350 Sacramento and partners wrote four letters commenting on preliminary County products. We identified 14 key elements needed in the CAP, as listed below (I’ve added two more). Our future advocacy will build on these, responding specifically to the draft CAP as needed. Needed CAP Elements: Equity. Address equity needs. Adaptation. Include adaptation measures. Regional Perspective. Include regional perspective [e.g., City/County cooperation in eliminating new sprawl development]. Land Use. Consider alternatives to County land use policies favoring sprawl . Electrify. Electrify all new buildings [and old housing stock]. EVs. Apply title 24, tier 2 standards for EV charging. Status Reports. Report on CAP implementation regularly. Trees. Include landscape standards to support urban forestry. Credible Measures. Measures should be detailed and actionable [i.e., feasible, effective, funded, scheduled]. Schedule. The CAP’s 12-month schedule may be too compressed to support needed public education and buy-in. Public Participation. The CAP is getting minimal public exposure compared to other plans. Implementation Responsibility. Identify a senior staff position responsible for CAP implementation. Updates. Update the GHG Inventory and CAP at least every four years [the current Inventory is five years old]. CEQA. Using an “Negative Declaration” for CEQA compliance is likely inappropriate. CAP Organization. After reviewing prelim docs, we asked the County to organize the CAP’s many proposed mitigation measures rationally, relating measures to emissions sources (on-road vehicles, building energy, etc.) and collating land use-related measures. [Local Offsets. Developers fees paid to offset unavoidable GHG emissions should be invested in local carbon-reduction projects, prioritizing disadvantaged neighborhoods (e.g., home energy-efficiency and electrification, urban greening, transit service, EV access.] [County Ops CAP. Audit implementation status of the 2012 County Operations CAP, and update as needed]. Written by Oscar B.